WHITE LION | History
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History of the White Lion
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White Lion Antiques is an antiques and lifestyle centre located in an 18th century coaching inn at Hartford Bridge, Hartley Wintney.

Allegedly a haunt of highwayman Dick Turpin, the White Lion was on the main admiralty route to the south west ports of Southampton, Bucklers Hard, Weymouth, Plymouth and Falmouth.

Cromwell and the Roundheads also used the White Lion Inn during the English Civil War, basing their headquarters at Hartford Bridge during heavy action in the area, including the siege of Basing House, one of the most notable local events of the episode.

In later years George III and his family took breakfast at the White Lion when journeying from Windsor to Weymouth.

In November 1805, Lt. John Richards Lapenotiere rode from Falmouth to the Admiralty with Vice Admiral Collingwood’s despatch of victory at Trafalgar. Lapenotiere’s ride took 37 hours and he changed horses 21 times. The White Lion was his 18th change and new horses cost him £1 15s 6d. The plaque outside the centre commemorates this event.